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Resolution 2418

Reports of the Secretary-General on the Sudan and South Sudan

Abstract

S/RES/2418 (2018)
Security Council Distr.: General 31 May 2018
Resolution 2418 (2018)
Adopted by the Security Council at its 8273rd meeting, on 31 May 2018
The Security Council, Recalling its previous resolutions and statements on South Sudan, in particular resolutions 2057 (2012), 2109 (2013), 2132 (2013), 2155 (2014), 2187 (2014), 2206 (2015), 2241 (2015), 2252 (2015), 2271 (2016), 2280 (2016), 2290 (2016), 2302 (2016), 2304 (2016), 2327 (2016), 2353 (2017), 2392 (2017), and 2406 (2018), Condemning in the strongest terms the ongoing fighting in violation of the 21 December 2017 “Agreement on Cessation of Hostilities, Protection of Civilians, and Humanitarian Access” (the ACOH), reiterating its demand that South Sudan’s leaders implement the permanent ceasefire declared in the 2015 “Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan” and ceasefires for which they respectively called on 11 July 2016 and 22 May 2017, as well as the ACOH, and calling on South Sudanese parties to demonstrate the political will to peacefully resolve the conflict, Determining that the situation in South Sudan continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security in the region, Acting under Article 41 of Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, 1. Decides to renew until 15 July 2018 the measures imposed by paragraphs 9 and 12 of resolution 2206 (2015), and reaffirms the provisions of paragraphs 10, 11, 13, 14 and 15 of resolution 2206 (2015), and the provisions of paragraphs 8, 9 and 10 of resolution 2290 (2016); 2. Decides to extend until 14 August 2018 the mandate of the Panel of Experts as set out in subparagraphs (a), (b), (c), and (f) of paragraph 12 of resolution 2290 (2016), and decides that the Panel of Experts should provide to the Committee updates each month, and expresses its intention to review the mandate and take appropriate action regarding the further extension of the mandate no later than 15 July 2018; 3. Requests the Secretary-General, in coordination with the Ceasefire and Transitional Security Arrangements Monitoring Mechanism (CTSAMM), to report by 30 June 2018 whether any fighting has taken place since adoption of this resolution involving parties to the cessation of hostilities agreement in South Sudan and to report on whether the parties have come to a viable political agreement and decides that if the Secretary-General reports such fighting or lack of a viable political agreement, it
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shall consider applying the measures specified in paragraphs 9 and 12 of resolution 2206 (2015) to the individuals identified in Annex 1 to this resolution and/or an arms embargo within five days of the Secretary-General’s report; 4. Decides to remain seized of the matter.
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Annex 1 Travel Ban/Asset Freeze (Individuals)
1. (1) Koang (2) Rambang (3) Chol a. Description: Rambang led attacks in Bieh state that expanded or extended the conflict in South Sudan. He ordered his forces to restrict the movement of people working in humanitarian organizations. He was responsible for the detention of two pilots delivering aid, obstructing their humanitarian activities. b. A.K.A.: (a) Koang (b) Rambang (c) Chuol c. Identifiers: na 2. (1) Kuol (2) Manyang (3) Juuk a. Description: Under Juuk’s command, SPLA forces violated the Agreement on Cessation of Hostilities, Protection of Civilians, and Humanitarian Access (ACOH) after it was signed by the Government of South Sudan in 2017 by attacking civilians. Juuk provided military equipment to the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N), in violation of the ACOH. In 2017, under Juuk’s command the SPLM expanded or extended the conflict through offensives in Pagak. b. A.K.A.: (a) Kuol (b) Manyang (c) Juuk Chaw c. Identifiers: DOB: 1945 3. (1) Malek (2) Reuben (3) Riak (4) Rengu a. Description: As SPLA Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, Riak was one of the senior officials of the Government of South Sudan who planned and oversaw an offensive in 2015 that resulted in widespread destruction and large population displacement. b. A.K.A.: (1) Malek (2) Ruben c. Identifiers: DOB: 01 Jan 1960 4. (1) Martin (2) Elia (3) Lomuro a. Description: In violation of the Agreement on Cessation of Hostilities, Protection of Civilians, and Humanitarian Access (ACOH) signed by the Government of South Sudan in 2017, Lomuro threatened members of the press, obstructed humanitarian missions, and threatened to eliminate the Ceasefire and Transitional Security Arrangements Monitoring Mechanism (CTSAMM). Lomuro also obstructed the activities of UNMISS. b. A.K.A.: (a) Martin (b) Elia (c) Lomoro; (a) Martin (b) Elias (c) Lomoro c. Identifiers: DOB: (a) November 20, 1957 or (b) December 1958 5. (1) Michael (2) Makuei (3) Lueth a. Description: Makuei expanded or extended the conflict in South Sudan through planning and coordinating a 2014 attack on the UN compound sheltering internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Bor. He obstructed the formation of the Transitional Government of National Unity, and worked to obstruct deployment of the Regional Protection Force of UNMISS. As Minister of Information, Broadcasting, Telecommunications, and Postal Services he has overseen attempts to repress the freedom of expression of civilians through the suppression of publications. He worked to close a UN-operated radio station authorized by the Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA) between the government and the UN.
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b. A.K.A.: (a) Michael Makwei (b) Michael Makwei Lueth (c) Michael Makuei Lueth Makuei c. Identifiers: DOB: 1947; POB: (a) Bor, South Sudan (b) Bor, Sudan; Nationality: (a) South Sudan (b) Sudan (c) Kenya 6. (1) Paul (2) Malong (3) Awan a. Description: As Chief of General Staff of the SPLA, Malong expanded or extended the conflict in South Sudan through breaches of the Cessation of Hostilities Agreement and breaches of the 2015 Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in South Sudan (ARCSS). He reportedly directed efforts to kill opposition leader Riek Machar. He ordered SPLA units to prevent the transport of humanitarian supplies. Under Malong’s leadership, the SPLA attacked civilians, schools and hospitals; forced the displacement of civilians; carried out enforced disappearances; arbitrarily detained civilians; and conducted acts of torture, and rape. He mobilized the Mathiang Anyoor Dinka tribal militia, which uses child soldiers. Under his leadership, the SPLA restricted UNMISS, JMEC, and CTSAMM access to sites to investigate and document abuses. b. A.K.A.: (a) Paul Malong Awan Anei (b) Paul Malong (c) Bol Malong c. Identifiers: DOB: 1962; Alt DOB: (a) 4 December 1960 or (b) 12 April 1960; POB: Malualkon, South Sudan; Nationality: (a) South Sudan (b) Uganda; Passport Nos.: (a) South Sudan S00004370 (b) South Sudan D00001369 (c) Sudan 003606 (d) Sudan 00606 (e) Sudan B002606

Topics
Sudan, South, Sudan
Year
2018
Title
Reports of the Secretary-General on the Sudan and South Sudan
Related with resolutions
2057 2109 2132 2155 2187 2206 2241 2252 2271 2280 2290 2302 2304 2327 2353 2392 2406
Security Council Composition
CHN FRA RUS GBR USA BOL ETH KAZ NLD SWE CIV GNQ KWT PER POL