Search engine for the United Nations Security Council Resolutions


Resolution 2482

Threats to international peace and security

Abstract

S/RES/2482 (2019)
Security Council Distr.: General 19 July 2019
Resolution 2482 (2019)
Adopted by the Security Council at its 8582nd meeting, on 19 July 2019
The Security Council, Recalling its resolutions 1267 (1999), 1373 (2001), 1452 (2002), 1526 (2004), 1617 (2005), 1624 (2005), 2129 (2013), 2133 (2014), 2170 (2014), 2178 (2014), 2195 (2014), 2199 (2015), 2242 (2015), 2249 (2015), 2253 (2015), 2322 (2016), 2331 (2016), 2341 (2017), 2347 (2017), 2354 (2017), 2368 (2017), 2370 (2017), 2388 (2017), 2395 (2017), 2396 (2017), 2462 (2019), 2467 (2019) and its relevant presidential statements, including PRST/2018/9, Reaffirming the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961 as amended by the 1972 Protocol, the Convention on Psychotropic Substances of 1971, the United Nations Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances of 1988, the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime of 2000 and the Protocols thereto, the United Nations Convention against Corruption of 2003, and the international counter-terrorism conventions and protocols, Welcoming the ongoing efforts by the Conference of the Parties to the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, Conference of States Parties to the UN Convention against Corruption, UN Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, and UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs to promote international cooperation against transnational organized crime, corruption, drug trafficking, trafficking in persons, money laundering, terrorism, and other crimes that may in some cases directly or indirectly support terrorism, as well as to assist Member States in this regard within their existing mandates, Expressing its concern that terrorists can benefit from organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, as a source of financing or logistical support, recognizing that the nature and scope of the linkages between terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, vary by context, and emphasizing the need to coordinate efforts at the local, national, subregional, regional, and international levels to respond to this challenge, in accordance with international law, including by promoting international legal cooperation, where relevant, Acknowledging, in this regard, that terrorists can benefit from organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, such as the trafficking in arms, drugs, artefacts, cultural property and trafficking in persons, as well as the illicit trade in natural resources including gold and other precious metals and stones, minerals, charcoal and oil, illicit trafficking in wildlife and other crimes that affect the environment, as well as from the abuse of legitimate commercial enterprise, non-profit organizations, donations, crowdfunding and proceeds of criminal activity, including but not limited to kidnapping for ransom, extortion and bank robbery, as well as from transnational organized crime at sea, Strongly condemning the continued flow of weapons, including small arms and light weapons, military equipment, unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) and their components, and improvised explosive device (IED) components to and between ISIL (also known as Da’esh), Al-Qaida, their affiliates, and associated groups, illegal armed groups and criminals, and encouraging Member States to prevent and disrupt procurement networks for such weapons, systems and components between ISIL (also known as Da’esh), Al-Qaida and associated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities, Emphasizing that the combined presence of terrorism, violent extremism conducive to terrorism, and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, may exacerbate conflicts in affected regions, and may contribute to undermining affected States, specifically their security, stability, governance, social and economic development, and noting that organized criminal groups and terrorists benefiting from organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, can, in some cases and in some regions, complicate conflict prevention and resolution efforts, Seriously concerned by instances of terrorist groups, including those benefiting from organized crime, conducting attacks including those on United Nations personnel, Reaffirming its commitment to sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of all States in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, and stressing that Member States have the primary responsibility in countering terrorist acts and violent extremism conducive to terrorism, Reaffirming that Member States must ensure that any measures taken to counter terrorism must comply with all their obligations under international law, in particular international human rights law, international refugee law and international humanitarian law, underscores that respect for human rights, fundamental freedoms and the rule of law are complementary and mutually reinforcing with effective counter-terrorism measures and are an essential part of a successful counter-terrorism effort, and notes the importance of respect for the rule of law so as to effectively prevent and combat terrorism, and further notes that failure to comply with these and other international obligations, including under the Charter of the United Nations, is one of the factors contributing to increased radicalization to violence and fosters a sense of impunity, Underscoring the need of Member States to strengthen, where appropriate, their criminal justice, law enforcement and border-control capacities, and to develop their capacity to investigate, prosecute, disrupt, and dismantle trafficking networks to address the linkages between terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, Recalling its urge to Member States to fully implement the “Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects” and the International Tracing Instrument in order to assist in preventing terrorists from acquiring small arms and light weapons, in particular in conflict and post-conflict areas, Encouraging Member States to collect relevant information and to further identify, analyze and counter any existing, growing or potential links, in some cases, between organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, illicit drug-related
S/RES/2482 (2019)
3/719 -12422
activities, money-laundering and the financing of terrorism, in order to enhance criminal justice responses to those crimes, and calling upon the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), within its relevant mandates, to support, upon request, the efforts of Member States in that regard, Stressing that the development and maintenance of fair and effective criminal justice systems should be a fundamental basis of any strategy to counter terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, Noting the important contribution that public-private partnerships can make in efforts to prevent and combat terrorism, corruption and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, Acknowledging that prisons can serve as potential incubators for radicalization to terrorism and terrorist recruitment, and that proper assessment and monitoring of persons convicted of terrorist offences is critical to mitigate opportunities for terrorists to attract new recruits, recognizing that prisons can also serve to rehabilitate and reintegrate prisoners, where appropriate, and also recognizing that Member States may need to continue to engage with offenders after release from prison to avoid recidivism, in accordance with relevant international law and taking into consideration, where appropriate, the United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners, or “Nelson Mandela Rules”, Recalling the importance for Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate (CTED) to include in CTED’s country assessments, as appropriate, information regarding Member States efforts to address the issue of trafficking in persons and its link with sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict situations committed by terrorist groups as part of their strategic objectives and ideology, and used as a tactic by certain parties to armed conflict, including non-state armed groups designated as terrorist groups, Recalling the Madrid Guiding Principles on Foreign Terrorist Fighters, including the recently adopted Addendum, (S/2018/1177), and stressing the importance of full and effective implementation of such principles, Noting recent developments and initiatives at the international, regional and subregional levels to prevent and suppress international terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, including the essential role of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and its Global Network of FATF-style regional bodies, as well as the work of the Global Counterterrorism Forum (GCTF), in particular the adoption of The Hague Good Practices on the Nexus between Transnational Organized Crime and Terrorism, 1. Calls upon Member States to enhance coordination of efforts at all levels in order to strengthen a global response to linkages between international terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, which constitute a serious challenge and a threat to international security; 2. Calls upon Member States to continue to conduct research and collect information to enhance knowledge of and better understand the nature and scope of the linkages that may exist between terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, to intensify and accelerate the timely exchange of relevant operational information and financial intelligence regarding actions, movements and patterns of movements of terrorists or terrorist networks, including foreign terrorist fighters, in accordance with domestic and international law; 3. Further stresses the importance of good governance and the need to fight against corruption, money-laundering and terrorist financing, in particular through the implementation of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (2000), the United Nations Convention against Corruption (2003),
S/RES/2482 (2019)
19-124224 /7
the International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism (1999) and the comprehensive international standards set forth in the FATF revised Forty Recommendations on Combating Money Laundering and the Financing of Terrorism and Proliferation, including by adopting and effectively implementing legislative and regulatory measures, to enable the competent domestic authorities to freeze or seize, confiscate and manage criminal assets, in order to combat illicit finance including terrorist financing and money-laundering; 4. Calls upon Member States to strengthen their efforts as well as international and regional cooperation to counter the threat to the international community posed by the illicit cultivation, production, trafficking, and consumption of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances, which can significantly contribute to the financial resources of terrorist groups, and to act in accordance with the principle of common and shared responsibility in addressing and countering the world drug problem, including through cooperation against the trafficking in illicit drugs and precursor chemicals, also underlining the importance of border management cooperation, and welcomes in this context the continued efforts of the UNODC; 5. Notes with concern that drug traffickers continue to exploit tools of modern commerce to traffic in precursors, pre-precursor chemicals and synthetic drugs, thereby contributing to the increased misuse of these drugs and the adverse consequences of their non-medical use, exploiting, for example, online markets for the illicit sale of such synthetic drugs, in particular synthetic opioids, in addition to exploiting the international mail system and express consignment carrier shipments to distribute such substances; 6. Urges all States to ensure that their domestic laws and regulations establish serious criminal offenses sufficient to provide the ability to prosecute and penalize in a manner duly reflecting the seriousness of the offence of trafficking in persons; 7. Calls upon Member States to investigate, disrupt and dismantle organized criminal networks involved in trafficking in persons in accordance with national legislation, including anti-money-laundering, anti-corruption and anti-bribery laws and, where appropriate, counter-terrorism laws; 8. Further calls upon Member States, where appropriate, to review, amend and implement legislation, including for acts of sexual and gender-based violence, to ensure that all forms of trafficking in persons, including when it is committed in situations of armed conflict or by armed and terrorist groups for the purpose of financing terrorism or to serve any strategic goals of terrorist groups are addressed, and to consider establishing jurisdiction to end the impunity of offenders; 9. Strongly urges all States to implement and strengthen compliance with the comprehensive international standards embodied in the revised Forty FATF Recommendations on Combating Money Laundering, and the Financing of Terrorism and Proliferation and its interpretive notes; and calls upon Member States to increase capacity to conduct proactive financial investigations to identify and disrupt trafficking in persons and identify potential linkages with terrorism; 10. Urges States that have not already done so, in order to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons, to adopt and implement the necessary legislative or other measures to establish as criminal offences under their domestic law the following illicit activities within their areas of jurisdiction in order to ensure that those engaged in such activities can be prosecuted: (a) illegal manufacture, possession, stockpiling and trade of all types of explosives, whether military or civilian, as well as other military or civilian materials and components that can be used to manufacture improvised explosive devices, including detonators, detonating cords and chemical components,
S/RES/2482 (2019)
5/719 -12422
(b) trafficking of military and dual-use materials and equipment that could be used for the illegal manufacture of arms and armaments, including explosive devices; 11. Urges States to adopt legislative and other measures, consistent with domestic marking laws and regulations, including criminal measures, to prohibit the illegal manufacture of unmarked or inadequately marked small arms and light weapons, as well as the illicit falsification, obliteration, removal or alteration of the unique markings prescribed in the International Tracing Instrument; 12. Further encourages States to promote and strengthen border cooperation and regional and subregional coordination, as appropriate, through effective measures and enhanced exchange of information, consistent with domestic laws and regulations, between law enforcement agencies, customs, and export and import licensing authorities, with a view to eradicating and combating the illicit activities listed in paragraphs 10 and 11 across borders; 13. Expresses concern at the illegal exploitation and trafficking of natural resources, such as precious metals and minerals like gold, silver, copper and diamonds, as well as timber, charcoal and wildlife, by armed groups, terrorist groups and criminal networks supporting them; 14. Encourages all States to continue efforts to end the illicit trade in natural resources, in particular in the gold sector, and to hold those complicit in the illicit trade accountable, as part of broader efforts to ensure that the illicit trade in natural resources is not benefiting sanctioned entities, terrorist groups, armed groups or criminal networks; 15. Calls upon Member States, including through relevant central and competent authorities, to: (a) strengthen border management, including by increasing awareness, training and capacity of relevant practitioners in border control, including with relevant organizations, to investigate and prosecute terrorists and terrorist groups and transnational organized criminals working with them, and to effectively identify and prevent their movement, (b) consider establishing, in conformity with international law, appropriate laws and mechanisms that allow for the broadest possible international cooperation, including the appointment of liaison officers, police to police cooperation, the creation/use, when appropriate, of joint investigation mechanisms, and enhanced coordination of cross-border investigations in cases related to the linkages between terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, (c) implement obligations to collect and analyze Advance Passenger Information (API) and develop the ability to collect, process and analyse, in furtherance of International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards recommended practices, Passenger Name Record (PNR) data and to ensure PNR data is used by and shared with competent national authorities, with full respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, which will help security officials make connections between individuals associated to organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, and terrorists, to stop terrorist travel and prosecute terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, including by making use of capacity building programmes, (d) develop the expertise of their Financial Intelligence Units (FIUs) to analyze financial intelligence of suspected activity of organized crimes, whether domestic or transnational, that support terrorism, including the financing of terrorism, and encourages them to work together to develop that capacity, and exchange information, in this regard,
S/RES/2482 (2019)
19-124226 /7
(e) consider the ratification and implementation of global instruments as well as their participation in national, regional and global initiatives that aim to build capacity to prevent and counter the illicit trafficking, including through seaports and at sea, of natural resources, arms, drugs, artefacts and cultural property, as well as trafficking in persons, in order to prevent and counteract the linkages between terrorism at sea and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, (f) enhance, when appropriate, the exchange of information between public authorities and relevant private sector entities; 16. Urges Member States to ensure that all measures taken to counter terrorism comply with their obligations under international law, including international humanitarian law, international human rights law and international refugee law, and urges states to take into account the potential effects of counterterrorism measures on exclusively humanitarian activities, including medical activities, that are carried out by impartial humanitarian actors in a manner consistent with international humanitarian law; 17. Encourages Member States to engage relevant local communities and non-governmental actors in developing strategies to counter violent extremism as and when conducive to terrorism, as well as strategies to counter organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, address the conditions conducive to the spread of violent extremism, which can be conducive to terrorism, and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, that may fund terrorism, including by empowering youth, families, women, religious, cultural and education leaders, and all other concerned groups of civil society; 18. Calls on Member States to increase the awareness, training and capacity of relevant practitioners in correctional systems on the linkages between terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, including where perpetrators of petty crime may be exploited or recruited by terrorists, as perpetrators of such crimes can develop and have actively pursued those linkages and other networks in prison settings; 19. Further calls on Member States to strengthen the capacity of criminal justice systems to combat the linkages, and ensure that investigators, prosecutors and legal professionals are trained to recognize such linkages between terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational; 20. Encourages Member States to take all appropriate actions to maintain a safe and humane environment in prisons, develop tools that can help address radicalization to violence and terrorist recruitment, in line with their obligations under international law and taking into account, the relevant guidance developed by UNODC, and explore ways to prevent, within their prison systems, radicalization to violence, and to promote rehabilitation and reintegration of convicted terrorists, as well as to impede cooperation and transfer of skills and knowledge between terrorists and other criminals, while respecting international human rights law; 21. Recognizes the role of regional and subregional organizations and mechanisms, consistent with Chapter VIII of the Charter of the United Nations, in deepening the assessment of threats in their respective regions, in contributing to the effective implementation of Security Council resolutions, in strengthening the capacities of Member States, in facilitating technical assistance and information sharing, and in contributing to national ownership and disseminating awareness; 22. Requests United Nations entities, particularly the United Nations Office for Counter Terrorism (UNOCT) and UNODC, as well as other Global Compact entities, to continue to provide technical assistance and capacity-building to Member States, upon their request, to support them in strengthening their response to linkages
S/RES/2482 (2019)
7/719 -12422
between international terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, including by the development of tools that can help address radicalization to terrorism in prisons and assess the risks of terrorist recruitment, consistent with international law, and encourages the Counter Terrorism Committee (CTC), with the support of CTED, to continue working together to facilitate technical assistance and capacity building and to raise awareness in this area, in particular by strengthening its dialogue with States and relevant international, regional and subregional organizations and working closely, including by sharing information, with relevant bilateral and multilateral technical assistance providers; 23. Directs the CTC, with the support of the CTED and in coordination with other relevant UN entities to continue as appropriate, within their respective mandates, to identify and examine Member States efforts in impeding terrorist groups from benefitting from organized crime, whether domestic or transnational, with the aim of identifying good practices, gaps and vulnerabilities in this field, and, in this regard, requests CTED, in accordance with Security Council resolution 2395, and in cooperation with the UNOCT and UNODC, to integrate consideration of linkages of terrorism and organized crime, whether transnational or domestic, into its country assessments and analyses and identify emerging trends and gaps in this regard; 24. Encourages Member States to make the best use of INTERPOL policing capabilities, including its array of investigative and analytical databases, in order to prevent and counter the linkages between terrorism and organized crime, whether domestic or transnational; 25. Requests the Secretary-General to submit to the Security Council, within twelve months, a joint report by the UNOCT and UNODC with inputs from the relevant entities of the United Nations system, including CTED, the Analytical Support and Sanctions Monitoring Team, on actions taken by Member States and the Global Compact entities to address the issue of linkages between terrorism and organized crime, whether transnational or domestic; 26. Decides to remain seized of this matter.

Topics
International Peace and Security, Terrorism
Year
2019
Title
Threats to international peace and security
Related with resolutions
1267 1373 1452 1526 1617 1624 2129 2133 2170 2178 2195 2199 2242 2249 2253 2322 2331 2341 2347 2354 2368 2370 2388 2395 2396 2462 2467
Security Council Composition
CHN FRA RUS GBR USA CIV GNQ KWT PER POL BEL DOM DEU IDN ZAF