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Resolution 2628

The situation in Somalia (ATMIS).

Abstract

Resolution 2628 (2022)
Adopted by the Security Council at its 9009th meeting, on 31 March 2022
The Security Council,
Recalling all its previous resolutions and statements of its President on the situation in Somalia, and reaffirming its respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence, and unity of Somalia,
Recalling that the Federal Government of Somalia (FGS) has primary responsibility for ensuring security in Somalia, and recognising Somalia’s request for continued international support to enable it to achieve progressively its aim of a secure, stable, peaceful, united and democratic country,
Stressing that international support should be provided in-line with the strategic direction set out by Somalia in the Somalia Transition Plan (STP), and National Security Architecture (NSA) and urging enhanced partnership and coordination between all stakeholders in support of stabilisation and state-building processes in Somalia,
Commending the contribution of the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) to building lasting peace and stability in Somalia since it was first authorised 15 years ago, and paying tribute to all AMISOM personnel, and Somali forces, especially those who gave their lives to their mission,
Welcoming the support provided by the United Nations Support Office in Somalia (UNSOS) to AMISOM, appreciating the financial support provided to AMISOM by the European Union and other donors, and noting the bilateral support provided by Member States to Somalia,
Recognising that the security situation in Somalia has changed significantly since AMISOM was first authorised, and noting improvements in Somalia’s capacity and capability to respond to security challenges,
Reaffirming the need to combat terrorist threats by all means, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and other obligations under international law, including applicable international human rights law, international refugee law, and international humanitarian law, and reaffirming that any acts of terrorism are criminal and unjustifiable, regardless of their motivations, whenever, wherever and by whomsoever committed,
Expressing grave concern that Al-Shabaab continues to pose a serious threat to the peace, security and stability of Somalia and the region, and noting its increased use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and exploitation of the licit financial system,
Expressing grave concern at the continued presence in Somalia of affiliates linked to Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL also known as Da’esh),
Recognising that the nature of the threat posed by Al-Shabaab has evolved, and that international support to Somalia must adapt accordingly to consolidate the security gains achieved to date and ensure continued progress towards a more stable, secure and peaceful Somalia,
Recalling the need for a reconfigured African Union mission in Somalia, which is focussed on enabling and supporting Somalia to take primary responsibility for its security, and expressing appreciation for Somalia and the African Union’s joint effort to update AMISOM’s Concept of Operations (CONOPS) in line with the STP and in close cooperation with the United Nations and international partners, to help inform decisions about the size and shape of the future mission, including its logistical requirements,
Noting with appreciation the proposal submitted to the Security Council on 7 March 2022 by the Secretary-General, and produced jointly with the African Union, in consultation with the FGS and donors, for the strategic objectives, size and composition of a reconfigured African Union mission in Somalia, as requested in resolution 2568 (2021) (hereafter Joint Proposal),
Noting the African Union Peace and Security Council’s communique of its 1068th meeting on 8 March 2022, and its decision to reconfigure AMISOM into the African Union Transition Mission in Somalia (ATMIS),
Stressing the need to ensure robust command and control and operational coordination, both among African Union deployed troop and police contingents and in the force generation and integration efforts of Somalia,
Emphasising the importance of capacity building and security sector reform to enable integrated Somali security forces and institutions to respond effectively to security threats, and further emphasising the importance of coordination between the FGS, Somalia’s Federal Member States (FMS), United Nations, African Union, and Somalia’s international partners, to ensure capacity building and security reform is joined-up, and enables Somalia to assume full responsibility for its security,
Recognising that military action alone will not be sufficient to resolve threats to peace and security in Somalia, emphasising that the protection of civilians is critical to build sustainable peace, and reiterating the need to pursue a holistic approach that reinforces the foundations of peace and stability, in line with priorities defined by Somalia including through enhancing:
(i) effective governance and public administration,
(ii) anti-corruption,
(iii) preventing organised crime,
(iv) the rule of law,
(v) justice and law enforcement,
(vi) efforts to counter terrorism,
(vii) efforts to promote terrorist disengagement and defections,
(viii) preventing and countering violent extremism conducive to terrorism,
(ix) security sector reform, and
(x) inclusive politics and reconciliation,
Noting the potential of international cooperation and support for peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction and development in Somalia, if provided in line with priorities defined by the Somali authorities, and further noting in this regard the African Union Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Development (AUPCRD) policy and the AUPCRD dedicated centre in Cairo,
Underlining the critical importance of the FGS and FMS reaching inclusive political agreements, urging them to collaborate on security and other national priorities, noting the responsibilities of all parties to improve cooperation and engage in discussions for the benefit of all Somalis, and underscoring that full cooperation of all parties would advance progress on national priorities including:
(i) implementation of the National Security Architecture,
(ii) implementation of the STP,
(iii) ensuring a fully functioning federal system, and
(iv) finalising the constitution as the legal and political foundation for Somalia’s government and institutions,
Welcoming the support provided by the United Nations Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) in this regard, and recalling its request in resolution 2592 (2021) for a strategic review of UNSOM after the completion of the current electoral process,
Noting that UNSOM and ATMIS have complementary mandates to support peace and reconciliation in Somalia, and that by providing security and strengthening Somalia’s security capacity, ATMIS will make a critical contribution to justice, local governance, peace and reconciliation,
Recognising the complementary work of the United Nations Panel of Experts for Somalia and the role of sanctions imposed by the United Nations Security Council, as, among other things, a non-military means of reducing the destabilising impact of Al-Shabaab’s activities in Somalia and the region, and supporting Somalia with security sector reforms, especially weapons and ammunition management,
Recalling its resolution 1325 (2000) and subsequent resolutions, recognising the important role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and in peacebuilding, and stressing the importance of the full, equal and meaningful participation and involvement of women in all efforts at all levels for the maintenance and promotion of peace and security, and the need to increase the role of women in decision-making and leadership regarding conflict prevention and resolution, as envisaged in the Somali Women’s Charter,
Condemning violations and abuses of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law in Somalia, calling on all parties to act in full compliance with their obligations under international human rights law and international humanitarian law,
Expressing serious concern about the humanitarian situation in Somalia, and calling for all parties to the conflict to allow and facilitate, in accordance with relevant provisions of international law, including applicable international humanitarian law, and in a manner consistent with the United Nations guiding principles of humanitarian emergency assistance (United Nations General Assembly resolution 46/182), including humanity, neutrality, impartiality and independence, the provision of humanitarian assistance necessary to support Somalia,
Emphasising the need for adequate risk assessment and risk management strategies by the FGS and the United Nations, of climate change, other ecological changes, natural disasters and other factors on the stability of Somalia,
Determining that the situation in Somalia continues to constitute a threat to regional and international peace and security,
Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,
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Somalia
1. Welcomes the 27 September 2020, 27 May 2021 and 09 January 2022 agreements, and urges the FGS and FMS to ensure any disputes over implementation of these agreements are resolved peaceably so the electoral process can be completed without further delay, and underscores that completing the electoral process, and achieving a peaceful transition of power, will help to progress national priorities and support transition from international security support in line with the STP and NSA;
2. Underscores the importance of progress on national priorities, including: the NSA, STP, the ninth National Development Plan, reaching agreement on a federated police and justice system, fiscal federalism, power and resource-sharing, the constitutional review, and local and national reconciliation, and in this regard welcomes the roadmap agreed on 27 May 2021, and urges Somalia to implement it without delay;
3. Reaffirms the importance of the full, equal, meaningful and effective participation of women, and the inclusion of all Somalis, including, youth, persons with disabilities, Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) and refugees in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, reconciliation processes, peacebuilding and elections and other political processes, and acknowledges the contribution that civil society can make in this regard and calls on Somalia to provide a safe environment for civil society organisations to work freely and protect them from threats and reprisals;
4. Reiterates its objective of enabling Somalia to take full responsibility for its own security, including through assuming the leading role in countering and addressing the threat posed by Al-Shabaab, including through the conduct of military operations to degrade Al-Shabaab’s capabilities, and strongly urges Somalia to use the opportunity and support provided by the international community to prioritise the implementation of the STP and NSA and the generation of accountable, affordable and able security forces so that ATMIS can continue its phased drawdown, and Somalia can assume full responsibility for its own security;
5. Calls on the Somali authorities to ensure the delivery of the STP and NSA is properly resourced, including the command, control and coordination mechanisms required to enable the planning, conduct and delivery of joint operations with ATMIS as well as the development of necessary logistical support capabilities;
6. Underscores the primary responsibility for protecting civilians of the Somali authorities, and further underscores the importance of protecting civilians in accordance with relevant provisions of international human rights law and international humanitarian law;
7. Calls on the Somali authorities, with the coordinated support of the international community, to assume progressively greater responsibility for national security, and to develop and implement a strategic plan to generate new security forces, integrate existing forces where appropriate, and train and equip current and newly generated forces, with clear targets and timelines and, in this regard, welcomes the FGS’ intention to generate a further:
(a) 3850 security forces by December 2022;
(b) 8525 security forces by September 2023;
(c) 10450 security forces by June 2024;
8. Calls on the FGS to work with the FMS on the process for force generation and integration of regional forces, noting the need for enhanced capacity and capabilities, within timelines that are compatible with the Joint Proposal and CONOPs;
9. Calls on the Somali authorities to enhance civilian oversight and accountability of their security apparatus and to continue to adopt and implement appropriate vetting procedures of all defence and security personnel, including human rights vetting;
10. Reaffirms the essential role of the police and justice sector in stabilisation efforts and the preparation and conduct of elections, calls on Somalia to fully support the state and federal police through effective training, provision of equipment, and sustainment support, reiterates the critical role police play in securing and holding territory and emphasises that a professional and capable police force, able to contribute to providing security for civilian populations, is necessary for Somalia to fully implement the STP and NSA, and encourages inclusive and representative Somali security and police force recruitment from all sections of Somali society;
11. Calls on Somalia to ensure all security and police forces fully respect international human rights law and international humanitarian law and to ensure that those responsible for violations and abuses of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law are held accountable, further calls on the United Nations, African Union and other international partners to support the Somali authorities with this as appropriate and requests that ATMIS share the experience and lessons-learnt from the operation of the Civilian Casualty Tracking Analysis and Response Cell (CCTARC) with national authorities, including with a view to supporting the development of Somali civilian casualty monitoring, mitigation, and prevention policies and mechanisms;
12. Calls on the Somali authorities, in coordination with ATMIS, international partners, and relevant United Nations entities, including UNMAS, to combat the illicit trade, transfer, diversion and accumulation of small arms and light weapons, to prevent access of unauthorised recipients to all types of explosives and related materials in Somalia, and to ensure their safe and effective management and storage;
13. Underlines the need for Somalia and its international partners to consider the security situation in each location during transition of security responsibilities from ATMIS to Somalia, and emphasises that planning, and decision-making should be guided by a comprehensive assessment of the threat to civilians, and that proactive measures to mitigate risks should be taken, including by establishing an appropriately sized, qualified and accountable Somali security and police force presence to ensure continued security and protection before, during and after military action;
14. Recalls resolutions 1612 (2005) and subsequent resolutions on Children and Armed Conflict and expresses its grave concern over reports of killing, maiming, rape and other forms of sexual violence used against children in armed conflict as well as unlawful recruitment and use, re-recruitment, including in non-combatant roles, and the abduction of children, and calls on the Somali authorities to:
(a) strengthen the legal framework on child protection and underscores the need for capacity building on child protection;
(b) take action to prevent all forms of violence against children and to hold those responsible to account;
(c) take appropriate measures to prevent attacks against civilian infrastructure including against schools and hospitals, and to prevent their military use;
(d) cease detentions of all children on national security charges where this is in violation of applicable international law and instead to treat children primarily as victims, consistent with Somalia’s obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child; and
(e) take action to fully implement their 2012 Action Plans, the 2014 standard operating procedures for the handover of children separated from armed groups, the 2018 Roadmap and the Working Group Conclusions on Children and Armed Conflict in Somalia (S/AC.51/2020/6);
15. Calls on all parties to armed conflict in Somalia to end sexual and gender-based violence and further calls on Somali authorities to work with relevant partners to:
(a) ensure protection for all from sexual and gender-based violence, and conflict-related sexual violence;
(b) ensure a survivor-centred and gender- and age-sensitive approach to preventing and responding to sexual and gender-based violence;
(c) take appropriate steps to investigate alleged abuses and prosecute alleged perpetrators to stop impunity;
(d) strengthen legislation to support accountability in line with resolution 2467 (2019) and other relevant resolutions; and
(e) accelerate the implementation of the Joint Communiqué and the National Action Plan on prevention of, and response to sexual violence in conflict;
16. Strongly condemns attacks as well as threats of attacks that are in contravention of international humanitarian law against schools and civilians connected with schools and urges all parties to armed conflict to immediately cease such attacks and threats of attacks and to refrain from actions that impede access to education;
17. Recalls its resolution 2417 (2018) and expresses grave concern at the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Somalia and its impact on the people of Somalia, encourages all partners including donors to maintain humanitarian assistance in 2022, strongly condemns any indiscriminate or direct attacks against humanitarian and medical personnel and civilian infrastructure, including by Al-Shabaab, as well as any misuse or obstruction of humanitarian assistance, reiterates its demand that all parties allow, in accordance with relevant provisions of international law and in line with humanitarian principles, full, safe, rapid and unhindered access for the timely delivery of humanitarian assistance to persons in need across Somalia, and underlines the importance of proper accounting of international humanitarian support;
Al-Shabaab and affiliates linked to ISIL
18. Condemns in the strongest terms the attacks by Al-Shabaab targeting security forces, and its terrorist attacks against government officials, civilians, and civilian infrastructure in Somalia and the wider region, as well as incidents of hostage-taking and kidnapping of civilians, its recruitment, training and use of foreign terrorist fighters, and notes with concern that these activities constitute a threat to peace and security in Somalia, regional stability, integration and development, and exacerbate humanitarian suffering;
19. Reiterates that the FGS has the primary responsibility for ensuring security in Somalia, and calls on Somalia to prioritise, coordinate and strengthen efforts to counter Al-Shabaab and affiliates linked to ISIL in a comprehensive manner, including through but not limited to the use of military operations to degrade their capabilities and disrupt their ability to access financial resources, weapons and ammunition, in full compliance with its obligations under international law, including international humanitarian law and international human rights law as applicable;
20. Reaffirms that all States shall prevent and suppress terrorist acts, urges all States to take action against Al-Shabaab and affiliates linked to ISIL in Somalia, in accordance with conventions dealing with terrorism, as well as applicable United Nations Security Council resolutions, including resolution 1373 (2001) and further reaffirms that Member States must ensure that any measures taken to counter terrorism comply with the Charter of the United Nations and all other obligations under international law, including international humanitarian law, international human rights law, and international refugee law;
21. Requests Somalia to strengthen cooperation and coordination with other Member States, particularly other Member States in the region, to prevent and counter the financing of terrorism, including compliance with resolution 1373 (2001), resolution 2178 (2014), resolution 2462 (2019), and urges Somalia, with the support of the African Union, the United Nations and other Member States to work closer together to increase the delivery of non-military activities to degrade Al-Shabaab and affiliates linked to ISIL, to prevent them conducting activities that harm the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of Somalia, to counter their terrorist activities, illicit finance, organised crime, access to, and trafficking in, arms and ammunition, including small arms and light weapons, IED manufacture, justice and propaganda activities, and to work, together with the international community, to implement the measures set out in 2607 (2021), including those measures imposed against individuals and groups designated by the Security Council Committee pursuant to resolution 751 (1992);
ATMIS
22. Endorses the African Union Peace and Security Council’s decision to reconfigure AMISOM into the African Union Transition Mission in Somalia (ATMIS), and authorises, for an initial period of 12 months, the Member States of the African Union to take all necessary measures, in full compliance with participating States’ obligations under international law, including international humanitarian law and international human rights law, and in full respect of the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of Somalia, to:
(a) carry out its mandate to reduce the threat posed by Al-Shabaab;
(b) support the capacity building of the integrated Somali security and police forces;
(c) conduct a phased handover of security responsibilities to Somalia; and
(d) to support peace and reconciliation efforts in Somalia, in line with the STP and NSA, in support of the development of a stable, federal, sovereign and united Somalia;
23. Decides to authorise ATMIS to pursue the following strategic objectives as outlined in the Joint Proposal:
(a) conducting jointly planned and targeted operations with Somali security forces to degrade Al-Shabaab and affiliates linked to ISIL;
(b) support Somali security forces by jointly holding priority population centres and providing protection for the local communities, United Nations personnel and installations, securing main supply routes identified by the FGS, and coordinating with stabilisation and reconciliation actors in collaboration with Somali security forces, to support the implementation of the Somali National Stabilisation Strategy and State Stabilisation Plans;
(c) assisting the FGS in the implementation of stabilisation efforts for all recovered areas in coordination with Community Recovery and Extension of State Authority and Accountability (CRESTA/A) and other stabilisation actors;
(d) supporting the capacity development of the Somali security forces with priority given to force generation, operational competencies and logistical support capabilities to facilitate progressive takeover of security responsibilities in Somalia;
(e) supporting Somali security forces across the clear, hold and build phases, in line with the STP, and in collaboration with federal government institutions by facilitating humanitarian liaison, community engagement as well as assisting Somali security forces with complying with international humanitarian law and international human rights law and holding accountable those responsible for violations thereof;
24. Decides to authorise ATMIS’ military, police and civilian components to conduct the tasks outlined in paragraphs 33 to 39 of the Joint Proposal, and recalls the CONOPs provides the following tasks:
(a) conduct joint simultaneous targeted offensive operations across all sectors, in coordination with Somali security forces to degrade Al-Shabaab and affiliates linked to ISIL;
(b) support Somali security forces in providing security for the political process at all levels, including stabilisation efforts, reconciliation and peacebuilding;
(c) configure ATMIS in terms of composition, structure, disposition and equipment, to best support the handover of security responsibility to Somali security forces;
(d) support Somali security forces in clearing main supply routes, including to areas recovered from Al-Shabaab; provide combat mentorship to the Somali National Army; enhance Somali National Army capacity to conduct civil-military coordination activities;
(e) jointly with partners, enhance Somali National Army capacity to conduct counter improvised explosive devices operations;
(f) ensure compliance with the rules of engagement, international humanitarian law, international human rights law and all international best practices;
(g) support specialised training, advising and mentoring and provide operational support, including joint patrols and protection of vital installations, to the Somali police in line with the Somali Transition Plan;
(h) support the service delivery capacity of the Somali police in the provision of policing services, across Somalia through police generation and deployments;
(i) support police-public partnerships for increased resilience to radicalisation to violence, violent extremism conducive to terrorism and social disorder through community policing and to support the efforts of the Somali police forces in the compliance of international humanitarian law, international human rights law, women peace and security resolutions and conduct and discipline standards;
(j) across the clear-hold-build phases of ATMIS operations, undertake activities to support the ATMIS uniformed components, as well as Somali security forces operating jointly with ATMIS, to carry out their operations in full compliance with obligations under international humanitarian law, international human rights law, and in compliance with the Human Rights Due Diligence Policy on United Nations support to Non-United Nations security forces (HRDDP), as well as in compliance with the African Union Compliance and Accountability Framework for Peace Support Operations;
(k) support early recovery initiatives in newly recovered areas, and humanitarian liaison;
(l) support the implementation of the Somali National Stabilisation Strategy;
(m) support relevant Somali ministries and institutions to implement the Somali Transition Plan priorities and provide necessary support in realising the objectives of ATMIS;
25. Affirms that where resolution 2607 (2021) refers to “AMISOM”, it shall be read as referring to ATMIS;
26. Authorises the Member States of the African Union to deploy up to 19,626 uniformed personnel, inclusive of a minimum of 1040 police personnel including five Formed Police Units, until 31 December 2022 and endorses the African Union Peace and Security Council’s decision to drawdown 2000 personnel by this date;
27. Authorises the Member States of the African Union, between 1 January 2023 and 31 March 2023, to deploy up to 17,626 uniformed personnel, inclusive of a minimum of 1040 police personnel including five Formed Police Units;
28. Notes the Joint Proposal and CONOPs envisage further reductions to 14,626 uniformed personnel, inclusive of a minimum number of 1040 police by the end of phase 2 (September 2023), 10,626 uniformed personnel, inclusive of a minimum number of 1040 police personnel by the end of phase 3 (June 2024), and zero personnel, by the end of phase 4 (December 2024), and expresses its intention to authorise, taking into account the situation in Somalia and the regular, joint technical assessments outlined in paragraph 51 to this resolution, these reductions;
29. Requests the African Union to ensure structures are in place to provide:
(a) clear oversight of ATMIS, and accountability mechanisms for the mission and its contingents;
(b) clear command and control of the mission and operational coordination between its contingents;
(c) coordinated operational decision making under the Force Commander and Sector Commanders;
(d) command, control and accountability of mission enabling units, including air assets;
(e) the creation, and deployment of mobile forces in ATMIS sectors; and
(f) that ATMIS instructions are to remain politically neutral and prioritise the protection of civilians;
30. Urges the African Union, with United Nations support, taking into consideration Statement of Unit Requirements (SURs), and within existing resources, to continuously review ATMIS’ operational capabilities to:
(a) enhance force protection to carry out mandated tasks; and
(b) identify gaps in resource requirements, and produce specific requests for resources and equipment to be fulfilled through voluntary contributions;
31. Underlines the importance of ATMIS forces continuing to cooperate with UNSOM and UNSOS in implementing the HRDDP across the preparatory, conduct and review phases of operations, including in the context of joint or coordinated operations with Somali security and police forces, and recognises the role that the African Union Compliance Framework and its operationalisation in ATMIS can play in enhancing compliance with international human rights law and international humanitarian law;
32. Calls on ATMIS to undertake, and on the African Union to ensure, regular monitoring and prompt and thorough investigations into and reporting on allegations of human rights violations and abuses and violations of international humanitarian law by ATMIS forces, as well as ensuring the highest standards of transparency, and conduct and discipline, and, where appropriate, harmonisation of their procedures with UNSOM, and urges troop- and police-contributing countries to strengthen their cooperation with the African Union and the United Nations to ensure the effectiveness of the ATMIS compliance and accountability measures;
33. Requests ATMIS to work closely with the CCTARC across all sectors, and underlines the importance of ensuring information is shared with relevant actors including the United Nations, is integrated into ATMIS reporting, and feeds into operational guidelines and plans, and requests the full support of troop and police contributors to the CCTARC, in collaboration with humanitarian, human rights and protection actors;
34. Requests ATMIS to support the implementation of the Joint Communique and National Action Plan to prevent and respond to sexual violence in conflict, and to take into account these specific concerns throughout the activities of all ATMIS components, and to ensure that risks of sexual violence in conflict are included in data collection, threat analysis and early warning systems, reaffirms the importance of a zero-tolerance policy on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse, stresses the need to prevent such exploitation and abuse, requests the African Union and troop- and police-contributing countries to screen personnel, undertake risk assessments, deliver all relevant training to personnel, to protect and support the relief and recovery of survivors who report abuse, carry out timely investigations into allegations, to hold perpetrators accountable, and to repatriate units where there is credible evidence of widespread or systemic sexual exploitation or abuse by members of those units, and further requests the African Union to work closely with the United Nations in this regard;
35. Encourages efforts to ensure female uniformed personnel are deployed to ATMIS by the troop- and police- contributing countries, and urges ATMIS to ensure the full, effective and meaningful participation of women across its operations and to integrate a gender perspective throughout the delivery of its mandate;
36. Notes Somalia’s request to the African Union on the recruitment of Somali nationals to ATMIS civilian staff positions;
UN Support Office in Somalia (UNSOS)
37. Requests the Secretary-General to continue to provide a logistical support package, and, in consultation with the African Union and FGS, develop an appropriate logistical support plan, in full compliance with HRDDP, through UNSOS for UNSOM, ATMIS uniformed personnel in line with paragraphs 26 and 27 to this resolution, and on the basis set out in paragraph 2 of resolution 2245 (2015), 70 ATMIS civilians, increasing to 85 ATMIS civilians from 1 January 2023, to support ATMIS’ military and police tasks and enhance coordination between the United Nations, African Union and FGS, and, through the United Nations Trust Fund in Somalia, support up to 13,900 Somali security forces, including an appropriate share of the state and federal police who are formally integrated into the Somali security forces in line with the National Security Architecture and who are actively participating in joint or coordinated operations with ATMIS that directly implement the STP;
38. Expresses its intention to consider increasing the number of Somali security forces eligible for support through UNSOS as set out in paragraph 37, subject to progress in force integration and generation as set out in paragraphs 7 and 8 and drawdown of ATMIS uniformed personnel as set out in paragraphs 26 and 27 of this resolution;
39. Underscores the importance of ATMIS and the Somali security forces working jointly with UNSOS on the delivery of logistics support, including, among other things, integrating UNSOS into planning for military operations, ensuring convoy and airfield security, protection of civilians and protecting main supply routes;
40. Underscores that the sustainability of peace and security support is improved by the implementation of the United Nations Department of Operational Support’s Environment Strategy (Phase II), which emphasises good stewardship of resources and a positive legacy of the mission, and identifies the goal of expanded renewable energy use in missions to enhance safety and security, save costs, offer efficiencies and benefit the mission, mindful of the Secretary-General’s call for field operations to shift to renewable energy by 2030 to meet UNSCAP goals;
41. Requests the Secretary-General to continue United Nations support to Somali security forces with training, equipment and mentorship to counter the threat of improvised explosive devices (IEDs);
42. Underscores that oversight and accountability, in particular compliance with HRDDP, should be the cornerstone of the partnership between the United Nations, the African Union, and Somalia, requests the Secretary-General to ensure that any support provided to non-United Nations security forces is provided in strict compliance with the HRDDP, and requests Somalia and African Union to agree an updated memorandum of understanding with the United Nations on the conditions of provision of United Nations support to Somalia;
43. Requests the Secretary-General to work closely with the African Union in supporting the implementation of this resolution, including to provide technical and expert advice on the planning, deployment and strategic management of ATMIS in line with the mandate of the United Nations office to the African Union;
International Support
44. Welcomes the continued financial support provided to the African Union mission in Somalia, especially from the European Union over the past 15 years, stresses the importance of including financial partners in ATMIS’s strategic decision-making process and stresses the importance of stringent monitoring of and accountability for financial and materiel support;
45. Urges Member States, including new donors, to consider providing predictable, sustainable and multi-year support for ATMIS, including through the provision of additional funding to the African Union for ATMIS’ civilian component to enable its support for the implementation of the STP, NSA and broader stabilisation efforts, as well as for troop and police stipends, equipment and technical assistance and to support the effective functioning of the CCTARC and disbursement of amends;
46. Urges Member States to consider providing funding to the United Nations Trust Fund in Somalia, including funding for training, equipment and mentoring of the Somali security and police forces, including to counter the threat of IEDs, and to stop the illicit proliferation of small arms and light weapons, and support for the African Union in mobilising the required resources and equipment for ATMIS, including through financial contributions to address identified gaps in resource requirements, and specific requests for resources and equipment;
47. Urges Member States to consider providing bilateral funding to support national and state-level institutions develop an integrated Somali security sector, including capacity building for the maritime police force in line with resolution 2246 (2015);
48. Underlines the need for Somalia and its partners to take a coordinated approach towards supporting Somali-led political and security reforms, to ensure consistency, maximise impact and enable sustained, progressive transition of security responsibility to Somalia and therefore:
(a) Urges the FGS to lead strategic coordination through regular high-level meetings of the Somali Transition Plan Strategic Steering Committee, the Security and Justice Committee and the Somalia Development and Reconstruction Facility Committee;
(b) Urges the FGS to agree all joint or coordinated operations, and strategic and operational decisions, including Somali security force generation with FMS, in coordination with ATMIS and the United Nations and other international partners where relevant;
(c) Requests the United Nations, in coordination with the FGS, African Union and European Union, to establish a technical partnership coordination function to increase coordination and collaboration between the FGS, FMS, ATMIS, UNSOM, UNSOS, the United Nations Country Team and Somalia’s other multilateral, regional and bilateral partners including by:
(i) sharing information, including the creation of a sector-by-sector dashboard of Key Performance Indicators;
(ii) conducting analysis, planning and performance assessment;
(iii) coordinating bilateral provision of capacity building support, training, mentoring and donations of equipment and supplies to Somali security and police forces;
(iv) ensuring that such support and assistance is provided in line with relevant provisions of resolution 2607 (2021); and
(v) ensuring that such support and assistance is compliant with the HRDDP;
49. Underlines the need to enhance the predictability, sustainability and flexibility of financing for African Union-led peace support operations authorised by the Security Council and under the Security Council’s authority consistent with Chapter VIII of the Charter, and encourages the Secretary-General, African Union and Member States to continue efforts to explore in earnest funding arrangements for ATMIS, bearing in mind the full range of options available to the United Nations, African Union, the European Union, and to other partners, and considering the limitations of voluntary funding, in order to establish secure future funding arrangements for ATMIS;
Evaluation and Reporting
50. Requests the United Nations, jointly with the African Union, FGS, European Union and other donors, to identify through an inclusive, consultative process: relevant, clear and realistic benchmarks, which include roles and responsibilities and measurable indicators for security transition, and that take into account the needs of all segments of the population, in order to assess the implementation of security transition, including benchmarks for the effectiveness of ATMIS, proposed by the African Union and benchmarks for the implementation of the STP and NSA proposed by the FGS, by 30 September 2022, taking into account resolution 2594 (2021);
51. Requests the United Nations, jointly with the African Union FGS, European Union and other donors, to undertake regular, joint technical assessments of progress made, and against the benchmarks requested in paragraph 50 to this resolution, to guide the Security Council as it further decides on the next steps of the phased drawdown of ATMIS and support provided by UNSOS, and to report to the Security Council by 15 February 2023;
52. Requests the FGS to provide an update to the Security Council, by 10 July 2022, 10 October 2022, and 10 January 2023 on:
(a) progress in implementing the STP and NSA and force generation and integration, as set out in paragraphs 7 and 8 of this resolution;
(b) progress in implementing the roadmap agreed on 27 May 2021;
53. Requests the African Union to keep the Security Council informed, through the Secretary-General, on the implementation of ATMIS’ mandate, by 10 July 2022, 10 October 2022 and 10 January 2023 and further requests in this regard, these reports contain specific reporting on:
(a) progress on joint operations in support of the STP and NSA including the use and effectiveness of coordination mechanisms with the FGS;
(b) evaluation of ATMIS’ command and control mechanisms;
(c) progress against strategic objectives outlined in paragraph 23;
(d) quantitative and qualitative assessment of progress against tasks outlined in the Joint Proposal and CONOPs;
(e) accountability measures taken to address previously identified underperformance, including command and control, and conduct and discipline;
(f) the effectiveness of measures taken to protect civilians;
(g) equipment review outcomes and use of force assets;
54. Requests the Secretary-General to keep the Security Council regularly informed on the implementation of this resolution, in their regular reports requested in paragraph 17 of resolution 2592 (2021) and recalls its request for the Secretary-General to submit to the Security Council a strategic review of UNSOM, as outlined in paragraph 18 of resolution 2592 (2021) and expresses its intention to provide a new date for its completion following the conclusion of the current electoral process in Somalia;
55. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

Topics
Somalia
Year
2022
Title
The situation in Somalia (ATMIS).
Related with resolutions
751 1325 1373 1612 2178 2245 2246 2417 2462 2467 2568 2592 2594 2607
Security Council Composition
CHN FRA RUS GBR USA IND IRL KEN MEX NOR ALB BRA GAB GHA ARE